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living-planet:

Parseid meteor shower over Denver [720x480]http://living-planet.tumblr.com/

living-planet:

Parseid meteor shower over Denver [720x480]

http://living-planet.tumblr.com/

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givemeinternet:

Blood Moon gif stabilized and slowed.

givemeinternet:

Blood Moon gif stabilized and slowed.

(via spaceplasma)

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huffingtonpost:

Everything you need to know about checking the four upcoming lunar eclipses here. 

(via spaceplasma)

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pennyfornasa:

Saturn May Have Produced a New Moon!
Say hello to Peggy! This new possible moon was spotted all clumped up on the outer rings of Saturn. Carl Murray (Queen Mary University, London), the lead author of the research paper recently published in the journal Icarus said, “We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right.” Nobody knows yet what Peggy might be, but one possibility is that it’s an accumulation of ring material that has collapsed gravitationally under its own weight. Some of Saturn’s moons, especially the ones orbiting near the rings, are thought to have formed this way.
It’s always amazing to see the discoveries heralded by astronomers that demonstrate how much we have yet to learn about our own Solar System. It’s why NASA and space exploration is important because we should try and make sense of the Universe and how it came to be. Seeing a possible moon form would be a first for us and it’s happening right in our own backyard! Cassini will try and get a closer look at Peggy in late 2016 when it makes a closer approach
We could continue making discoveries and send more missions out into the Solar System, and even beyond with a Penny4NASA. So what are you waiting for? Take action today by visiting www.penny4nasa.com/take-action
Read more about the discovery of Peggy here: http://www.universetoday.com/111233/is-saturn-making-a-new-moon/

pennyfornasa:

Saturn May Have Produced a New Moon!

Say hello to Peggy! This new possible moon was spotted all clumped up on the outer rings of Saturn. Carl Murray (Queen Mary University, London), the lead author of the research paper recently published in the journal Icarus said, “We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right.” Nobody knows yet what Peggy might be, but one possibility is that it’s an accumulation of ring material that has collapsed gravitationally under its own weight. Some of Saturn’s moons, especially the ones orbiting near the rings, are thought to have formed this way.

It’s always amazing to see the discoveries heralded by astronomers that demonstrate how much we have yet to learn about our own Solar System. It’s why NASA and space exploration is important because we should try and make sense of the Universe and how it came to be. Seeing a possible moon form would be a first for us and it’s happening right in our own backyard! Cassini will try and get a closer look at Peggy in late 2016 when it makes a closer approach

We could continue making discoveries and send more missions out into the Solar System, and even beyond with a Penny4NASA. So what are you waiting for? Take action today by visiting www.penny4nasa.com/take-action

Read more about the discovery of Peggy here: http://www.universetoday.com/111233/is-saturn-making-a-new-moon/

(via spaceplasma)

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thedemon-hauntedworld:

Starburst Galaxy IC 10 
Lurking behind dust and stars near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, IC 10 is a mere 2.3 million light-years distant. Its light dimmed by the intervening dust, the irregular dwarf galaxy still shows off vigorous star-forming regions that shine with a telltale reddish glow in this colorful skyscape. In fact, also a member of the Local Group of galaxies, IC 10 is the closest known starburst galaxy. Compared to other Local Group galaxies, IC 10 has a large population of newly formed stars that are massive and intrinsically very bright, including a luminous X-ray binary star system thought to contain a black hole. Located within the boundaries of the northern constellation Cassiopeia, IC 10 is about 5,000 light-years across.

Credit: Mike Siniscalchi

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Starburst Galaxy IC 10 
Lurking behind dust and stars near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, IC 10 is a mere 2.3 million light-years distant. Its light dimmed by the intervening dust, the irregular dwarf galaxy still shows off vigorous star-forming regions that shine with a telltale reddish glow in this colorful skyscape. In fact, also a member of the Local Group of galaxies, IC 10 is the closest known starburst galaxy. Compared to other Local Group galaxies, IC 10 has a large population of newly formed stars that are massive and intrinsically very bright, including a luminous X-ray binary star system thought to contain a black hole. Located within the boundaries of the northern constellation Cassiopeia, IC 10 is about 5,000 light-years across.

Credit: Mike Siniscalchi

(via keroros)

Photoset

spaceplasma:

Ganymede and Callisto are similar in size and are made of a similar mixture of ice and rock, but data from the Galileo and Voyager spacecraft show that they look different at the surface and on the inside. Just like Earth and Venus, Ganymede and Callisto are twins, and understanding how they were born the same and grew up to be so different is of tremendous interest to planetary scientists.

Ganymede and Callisto’s evolutionary paths diverged about 3.8 billion years ago during the Late Heavy Bombardment, the phase in lunar history dominated by large impact events. Impacts during this period melted Ganymede so thoroughly and deeply that the heat could not be quickly removed. All of Ganymede’s rock sank to its center the same way that all the chocolate chips sink to the bottom of a melted carton of ice cream. Callisto received fewer impacts at lower velocities and avoided complete melting. Ganymede is closer to Jupiter and therefore is hit by twice as many icy impactors as Callisto, and the impactors hitting Ganymede have a higher average velocity.

Image Credit: NOAA/GSD

(Source: swri.org)

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spacettf:

Triangulum Galaxy by Leveye on Flickr.
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sciencefictiongallery:

John Harris - Saturn
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(Source: gemclub, via prometheusfalls)

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michaelk42:

Planetes
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thedemon-hauntedworld:

IC 4628: The Prawn Nebula
Credit: ESO; Acknowledgement: Martin Pugh

South of Antares, in the tail of the nebula-rich constellation Scorpius, lies emission nebula IC 4628. Nearby hot, massive stars, millions of years young, radiate the nebula with invisible ultraviolet light, stripping electrons from atoms. The electrons eventually recombine with the atoms to produce the visible nebular glow, dominated by the red emission of hydrogen. At an estimated distance of 6,000 light-years, the region shown is about 250 light-years across, spanning an area equivalent to four full moons on the sky. The nebula is also cataloged as Gum 56 for Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum, but seafood-loving astronomers might know this cosmic cloud as The Prawn Nebula.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

IC 4628: The Prawn Nebula
Credit: ESO; Acknowledgement: Martin Pugh

South of Antares, in the tail of the nebula-rich constellation Scorpius, lies emission nebula IC 4628. Nearby hot, massive stars, millions of years young, radiate the nebula with invisible ultraviolet light, stripping electrons from atoms. The electrons eventually recombine with the atoms to produce the visible nebular glow, dominated by the red emission of hydrogen. At an estimated distance of 6,000 light-years, the region shown is about 250 light-years across, spanning an area equivalent to four full moons on the sky. The nebula is also cataloged as Gum 56 for Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum, but seafood-loving astronomers might know this cosmic cloud as The Prawn Nebula.

(via keroros)

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themagicfarawayttree:

DEEP SPACE
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ddnjapan:

太陽系の惑星が、人々と同じくらい個性的だということがわかる画像 | DDN JAPAN http://bit.ly/1sW8g2q

ddnjapan:

太陽系の惑星が、人々と同じくらい個性的だということがわかる画像 | DDN JAPAN http://bit.ly/1sW8g2q

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martinlkennedy:

I love cutaway tech illustrations. As a kid I’d spend hours looking at them, like a kind of Where’s Wally for geeks. These are from the Hamlyn Encyclopedia of Space, 1981.

(via junmyk)